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Battleship Artwork - HMS Hood 1937

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HMS Hood 1937 - Main Mast and Little Boats

HMS Hood was an Empire Ship that sailed the world. As such, her upper decks were an interesting mix, of both peacetime and wartime:


HMS Hood 1937 - Main Mast and Little Boats


For me, the peacetime is represented by the variety of smaller boats that she carried on-board. I believe that these were used when she was in port, or when she had anchored off some tropical island, for some rest and relaxation (for her sailors). Yet, she was still a warship, with the armament to match! Here we can see: a 5.5 inch naval gun (lower left), a 4 inch high angle anti-aircraft gun (middle-bottom), and a quadruple 0.5 inch anti-aircraft gun (middle-bottom right). Now, I've heard it said, that sailors don't have a fear of heights! Hood's main mast, would appear to test this theory - with the mast's ladders being used to gain access, to both lookout posts, and wireless radio equipment. The long horizontal boom, that stems from the base of the main mast, is the main derrick, which was 65 feet long! I believe this was used, to lift both the smaller boats, and other heavy equipment (such as ammunition crates).

14/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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HMS Hood 1937 - Spotting Top

The highest observation point located on-board HMS Hood, was her spotting top:


HMS Hood 1937 - Spotting Top


It is here, that her look outs would have scowled the seas, looking for the tell tale glimpse, of an enemy vessel (in a time before radar). The tripod mast on the back, is where Hood's wireless rig was attached (the six horizontal lines coming in from the top left). Both structures, were supported by a single starfish - the black metallic structure, that's located underneath. One of HMS Hood's three survivors (from when she was sunk), was actually stationed in the spotting top - surviving because he was washed through a window, as everything else around him sunk!

14/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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HMS Hood 1937 - Front Conning Tower

Here we can see, what I regard as HMS Hood's front conning tower:


HMS Hood 1937 - Front Conning Tower


Though technically the term conning tower, only applies to the elliptical structure on the front (with the rest being superstructure). The conning tower itself, was concerned with the aiming of the primary armament 15 inch naval guns. It was protected by armour of up to 11 inches thick: to ensure that Hood's 15 inch naval guns, could be aimed and fired, even in the heaviest action. The superstructure itself, was concerned with both the manoeuvrability of HMS Hood (such as steering and navigation), and further fire control (for both the secondary armament, and anti-aircraft guns). The superstructure was soft (aka thinly protected), to save armour weight. It included such equipment as: search lights, 3 pounder saluting guns, quadruple 0.5 inch anti-aircraft guns, eight barrelled two pounder anti-aircraft pom-poms directors, 5.5 inch secondary armament directors, evershed transmitters and air defence platform equipment (e.g. binoculars).

10/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

HMS Hood 1937 - Front Conning Tower - Aft Details : Which clearly shows, the various staircases (or ladders), that were used by crew members, to gain access to different levels.

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HMS Hood 1937 - Naval Gun Turrets A and B

The most important part of a battleship, has always been it's primary armament naval guns:


HMS Hood 1937 - Naval Gun Turrets A and B


In the case of HMS Hood, these were 15 inch calibre - and are regarded, as some of the best naval guns, that were ever fitted to a battleship. Every single sailor, and every single system on-board HMS Hood, was there to serve these guns - to ensure that they could open fire: at the right range, at the right time, and at the right target! They were the most heavily protected part of HMS Hood - with turret face armour being 15 inches thick. The turrets sat atop the barbettes (the vertical cylinders), that were themselves protected by armour, of up to 12 inches thick (thereby protecting the shell supply chain). Hood's two forward naval gun turrets (referred to as A and B), are also somewhat unique in their decoration. At this time, A turret carried a red circular flagship marking - and B turret carried her Spanish Civil War marking (the blue/white/red stripes). Towards the back of each gun turret, is it's local control range finder - which adhered to a general rule: the wider the better, as a wider range finder, tended towards increased target accuracy.

10/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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HMS Hood 1937 - Anchors and Anchor Chains

I've always found it interesting, that HMS Hood had three anchor chains:


HMS Hood 1937 - Anchors and Anchor Chains


When it comes to ships, the heavier they are (in terms of displacement), the more anchor chain you need, to keep your ship from moving, when laying anchor. Granted, it's the anchor that digs into the sea bed, but the chain also lays on the bottom - thereby resisting the movement of the ship. In 1937, Hood had three anchor chains - but by 1940, the closest anchor chain (shown above) had been removed. Yet here do I find a paradox! For HMS Hood's displacement, gradually increased over time (through various overhauls and refits) - so surely she would need the safety-net, of a third anchor and chain, even more?

10/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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Battleship Artwork - HMS Hood 1937