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The Nebula Hawk Battleship Seaport has currently reviewed the following:

Battleship Artwork - Warship Artwork - Digital Commission, HMS Hood 1937 - Forecastle Deck, HMS Hood 1937 - Minesweeper and Winches, HMS Hood 1937 - Naval Gun Turrets A and B, HMS Hood 1937 - Stern Deck

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HMS Hood 1937 - Stern Deck

Here we can see the stern deck area of HMS Hood. What I most liked about Hood's stern profile, was the fact that she had a matched pair of naval gun turrets, mounted astern:


HMS Hood 1937 - Stern Deck


Later battleships (including both American, and Japanese), would only have a single gun turret, mounted astern. I feel that the matched pair (in Hood), catered for a more balanced profile - both in terms of her appearance, and in terms of her firepower. Hood's stern deck, was an interesting area of contradiction! For on her Empire Cruise (when she sailed the British Empire), was this area often where the VIPs (such as Royalty) were entertained. With the wooden handrail ladders (middle-bottom right), leading to the Admiral's Day Cabin - came much pomp and ceremony. And yet, when Hood was at sea, even in a fairly calm sea, was this entire stern deck area, often awash with sea water! The stern deck had been designed too low in the waterline. Yet, there is some irony here. For in the wreck of HMS Hood (at the bottom of the North Atlantic), is it the stern deck and it's flag pole, that stand up from the sea bed, as if in salute.

15/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk | Web: HMS Hood Wreck - Stern Deck

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HMS Hood 1937 - Forecastle Deck

Here we can see the bow of HMS Hood, which was - long and fine:


HMS Hood 1937 - Forecastle Deck


This was for one simple reason - speed. Without a bow that was long, fine and sheared, Hood could not have attained her top speed of 32 knots. Only the hull form in the vicinity of A turret aft, would have been armoured - with the bow being soft. In retrospect, this arrangement was not adequate. Specifically, the deck area around the base of the two gun turrets and barbettes, was regarded as too thinly armoured, and was not thick enough to guard against plunging shellfire (although plans had been made, to thicken the armour in this area). Another point of interest, are Hood's breakwater arrangements - which were designed to protect the forecastle deck, from bow spray (as was encountered, when she pitched into heavy seas).

14/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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HMS Hood 1937 - Naval Gun Turrets A and B

The most important part of a battleship, has always been it's primary armament naval guns:


HMS Hood 1937 - Naval Gun Turrets A and B


In the case of HMS Hood, these were 15 inch calibre - and are regarded, as some of the best naval guns, that were ever fitted to a battleship. Every single sailor, and every single system on-board HMS Hood, was there to serve these guns - to ensure that they could open fire: at the right range, at the right time, and at the right target! They were the most heavily protected part of HMS Hood - with turret face armour being 15 inches thick. The turrets sat atop the barbettes (the vertical cylinders), that were themselves protected by armour, of up to 12 inches thick (thereby protecting the shell supply chain). Hood's two forward naval gun turrets (referred to as A and B), are also somewhat unique in their decoration. At this time, A turret carried a red circular flagship marking - and B turret carried her Spanish Civil War marking (the blue/white/red stripes). Towards the back of each gun turret, is it's local control range finder - which adhered to a general rule: the wider the better, as a wider range finder, tended towards increased target accuracy.

10/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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HMS Hood 1937 - Minesweeper and Winches

Whilst it's hard to imagine HMS Hood being used as a Minesweeper, she was equipped as such!


HMS Hood 1937 - Minesweeper and Winches


On the left, can we see a Minesweeper's Para-vane, which would for example, have been towed behind HMS Hood, when looking for mines. To the right of this, can we find both ventilation shafts (at the foot of the main armoured conning tower), and various winches (which I believe, were used for hauling her fifteen inch shells aboard). To the right of these, is the barbette of B turret, which featuring armour of up to 12 inches thick, protected the shell supply chain, of the dual 15 inch gun turret (that sat on-top). Just visible bottom right, is one of Hood's breakwaters (designed to protect the forecastle deck, from bow spray).

05/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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Battleship Artwork - Warship Artwork - Digital Commission

3D Modellers, with a passion for preserving the past, particularly pertaining to Battleships :) The Pride of the Royal Navy herself, HMS Hood (as she appeared in 1937):


HMS Hood 1937 - Forecastle Deck - With Naval Guns A and B showing Flagship and Spanish Civil War markings (respectively).


Battleships were the Greatest Warships of their time, and to the Men that served on them, they lived a way of life, that now no longer exists ... Our Military Artwork, aims to help preserve these bygone times, and it is hoped, that it shall be of interest to Military Museums, and to other such areas of public interest (e.g. education) - together with private collectors.

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Battleship Artwork - HMS Hood 1937